Nextide Academy – Standard American High School Diploma

Nextide Academy offers the Standard Diploma to help make earning a high school diploma an attainable goal for students who want to enter the job market, the military, or a community or technical college after graduation. This path is made up of core courses and electives that are taught at a basic level allowing you to earn your high school diploma without being required to take any advanced math, science, or foreign language courses.

High School – Standard Curriculum (22 credits)

Core Courses Requirement  – 15 credits

Language Arts – 4 credits

Credits: 1
English EL901 introduces the elements of writing poems, short stories, plays, and essays. Grammar skills are enhanced by the study of sentence structure and style and by student composition of paragraphs and short essays. Topics include narration, exposition, description, argumentation, punctuation, usage, spelling, and sentence and paragraph structure.

Credits: 1
English EL1001 focuses on using personal experiences, opinions, and interests as a foundation for developing effective writing skills. Skills acquired in English I are reinforced and refined. Literary models demonstrate paragraph unity and more sophisticated word choice. A research paper is required for completion of course. Topics include grammar, sentence and paragraph structure, organizing compositions, and the research paper.

Credits: 1
English EL1101 explores the relation between American history and literature from the colonial period through the realism and naturalism eras. English 11B explores the relation between American history and literature from the modernist period through the contemporary era, and presents learners with relevant cultural and political history. Readings are scaffolded with pre-reading information, interactions, and activities to actively engage learners in the content. The lessons in both semesters focus on developing grammar, vocabulary, speech, and writing skills.

Credits: 1
In keeping with the model established in English – EL1101, English – EL1201 emphasize the study of literature in the context of specific historical periods, beginning with the Anglo-Saxon and medieval periods in Britain. Each lesson includes tutorials and embedded lesson activities that provide for a more engaging and effective learning experience. Semester B covers the romantic, Victorian, and modern eras. End of unit tests ensure mastery of the concepts taught in each unit, and exemptive pretests allow students to focus on content that they have yet to master.

Mathematics – 3 credits

Credits: 1
Algebra AL901 covers 12 units over two semester-long courses, laying an essential foundation as your students begin exploring math at a more sophisticated level. Semester A begins with a survey of single-variable expressions, equations, and inequalities, and proceeds through other fundamental algebraic concepts, concluding with a unit covering the rules of polynomials and exponents. Semester B builds on that foundation and uses interactive and engaging exercises to expand knowledge and develop the critical thinking skills that lead to concept mastery and prepare students for their next steps in math.

Credits: 1
Algebra AL1001 builds on the fundamentals established in Algebra AL901. Built to the Common Core, these courses use a scaffolded inquiry approach that better enables students to master course content and principles. Semester A begins with an in-depth look at polynomial, rational, and radical relationships and concludes with a solid understanding of complex numbers. The second semester focuses on the use of various algebraic functions, including trigonometric functions, and the use of functions for modelling and graphing.
Credits: 1
A comprehensive examination of geometric concepts, each lesson provides thorough explanations and builds on prior lessons. Step-by-step instruction and multiple opportunities for self-check practice develop skills and confidence in students as they progress through the course. The course features animations, which allow students to manipulate angles or create shapes, such as triangles, engage students in learning and enhance mastery. Labs extend comprehension by giving students hand-on experiences.

Science – 2 credits

Credits: 1
Students develop a clear understanding of the sometimes complex concepts at the root of life science. Course units cover genetics and evolution, cell structure, multiple units on the diversity of life and on plant structure and function. For example, the unit on cell structure and specialization drills down into mitosis, meiosis, and cancer and carcinogens.

Credits: 1
The lessons in this course employ direct-instruction approaches. They include application and inquiry oriented activities that facilitate the development of higher-order cognitive skills, such as logical reasoning, sense-making, and problem solving.

Social Science – 3 credits

Credits: 1
Economics EC901 leverages diverse resources from the National Council on Economic Education in partnership with the National Association of Economic Educators, and the Foundation for Teaching Economics. It begins with providing a basic understanding of the U.S. economy and its relationship to the world economy. It then covers macro issues such as government and the economy and micro issues such as entrepreneurship and consumer issues.

Credits: 1
US History UH901 not only introduces students to early U.S. History, but it also provides them with an essential understanding of how to read, understand, and interpret history. For example, the first unit, The Historical Process, teaches reading and writing about history; gathering and interpreting historical sources; and analyzing historical information. While covering historical events from the founding events and principles of the United States through contemporary events, the course also promotes a cross-disciplinary understanding that promotes a holistic perspective of U.S. History.
Credits: 1
In an increasingly interconnected world, equipping students to develop a better understanding of our global neighbors is critical to ensuring that they are college and career ready. These semester-long courses empower students to increase their knowledge of the world in which they live and how its diverse geographies shape the international community. Semester A units begin with an overview of the physical world and the tools necessary to exploring it effectively. Subsequent units survey each continent and its physical characteristics and engage students and encourage them to develop a global perspective.

Foreign Language, Fine Arts and Technical Education – 2 credits

Credits: 1
Students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates ―Avatar bucks—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase items (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the ―Avatar store. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Credits: 0.5
Art – AR901 explores the main concepts of art, expression, and creativity as it helps students answer questions such as what is art; what is creativity; and how and why people respond to art. It covers essential design principles such as emphasis, balance, and unity. Units include: Art, History, and Culture; Western and World Art Appreciation; and Art and the Modern World.
Credits: 0.5
Throughout the Computer Applications & Technology – CT901 course,  students are presented with a variety of computer applications and technology concepts and demonstrate their understanding of those concepts through practical problem-solving exercises. A course project includes activities related to the course objectives and can be assigned for work throughout the course.

Health and Physical Education – 1 credit

Credits: 0.5
Health – HE901 is based on a rigorously researched scope and sequence that covers the essential concepts of health. Students are provided with a variety of health concepts and demonstrate their understanding of  those concepts through problem solving. The five units explore a wide variety of topics that include nutrition and fitness, disease and injury, development and sexuality, substance abuse, and mental and community health.
Credits: 0.5
Physical Education – PE901  course’s three units include Getting Active, Improving Performance, and Lifestyle. Unit activities elevate students’ self-awareness of their health and well-being while examining topics such as diet and mental  health and exploring websites and other resources. In addition to being effective as a stand-alone course, the components can be easily integrated into other health and wellness courses.

Elective Courses Requirement – 7 credits

AP® Courses

Credits: 1
AP® English Literature and Composition – EL1501 is based on a researched scope and sequence that covers the essential concepts of literature at an AP level. Students engage in in-depth analysis of literary works in order to provide both depth and breadth of coverage of the readings. Units include Close Analysis and Interpretation of Fiction, Short Fiction, the Novel, and Poetic Form and Content. Writing activities reinforce the reading activities and include writing arguments, analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and college application essays.
Credits: 1
AP® Calculus – CL1501 grounds the study of calculus in real-world scenarios and integrates it with the four STEM disciplines. The first semester covers functions, limits, derivatives and the application of derivatives. The course goes on to cover differentiation and antidifferentiation, applications of integration, inverse functions, and techniques of integration.

Credits: 1
AP® Biology – BL1501
To generate skills for lifelong learning, 25 percent of the lessons in AP® Biology – BL1501 use student-driven, constructivist approaches for concept development. The remaining lessons employ direct-instruction AP approaches. In both cases, the lessons incorporate multimedia-rich, interactive resources to make learning an engaging experience. The AP approach to advanced biology topics helps students achieve mastery of abstract concepts and their application in everyday life and in STEM-related professions.

Credits: 1
AP® Chemistry – CH1501 includes most of the 22 laboratory experiments recommended by the College Board to provide a complete AP experience in a blended environment. More than 25 percent of the online lesson modules are inquiry-based and employ online simulations, data-based analysis, online data-based tools, and kitchen sink labs that require no specialized equipment or supervision. Many of the lessons include significant practice in stoichiometry and other critical, advanced chemistry skills.

Credits: 1
AP® US History – UH1501 develops critical thinking skills by encouraging multiple views as students realized that there are often multiple accounts of a single historical event that may not be entirely consistent. Electronic discussion groups encourage collaboration, and a variety of practice activities are provided, from multiple choice actions to advanced interactions. Units include: The Historical Process; Early America; Revolutionary America; The Civil War; Populism and Progressivism; the emergence of the U.S. as a world power; and contemporary themes.

Language Arts

Credits: 1
American Literature – EL1401 surveys American authors and the historical development of literature in America. The course illustrates how the events in history and the cultural heritage of the times influenced the work of authors. The ability to analyze literary works is stressed. Topics include Puritanism, Deism, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Realism, and Naturalism.

Credits: 1
British Literature – EL1402 provides a comprehensive look at the evolution of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Modern Age. The course emphasizes the cultural and historical elements that shape literary movements. Twenty-six of the thirty-four lessons focus on literary analysis, while writing lessons focus on real-world applications, analytical essays, and research papers. Language lessons focus on usage, mechanics, and critical thinking. Of course all course readings and literary texts are provided online.

Credits: 1
World Literature – EL1403 provides students with a survey of some of the world’s best and most well-known literature. Lesson notes supplement reading assignments and emphasize common themes found across cultures and historical timelines. Submissions use a combination of objective multiple choice and short answer questions, as well as subjective questions that require students to support their opinions. Finally, two full-length writing assignments ask students to apply their knowledge in essay form.

Credits: 0.5
Structure of Writing – EL1404 focuses on building good sentences. Students will learn how to put words, phrases, and clauses together and how to punctuate correctly. They will start using sentences in short compositions. As an extra bonus, students will add some new words to their vocabulary, and they will practice spelling difficult words. Near the end of the course, students are to submit a book report. Early in the course, encourage students to start looking for the books they want to read for the book report. They might also preview the introduction to that lesson so they know what will be expected.

Mathematics – 3 credits

Credits: 1
Precalculus – CL1201 builds on algebraic concepts to prepare students for calculus. The course begins with a review of basic algebraic concepts and moves into operations with functions, where students manipulate functions   and their graphs. Precalculus also provides a detailed look at trigonometric functions, their graphs, the trigonometric identities, and the unit circle. Finally, students are introduced to polar coordinates, parametric equations, and limits.
Credits: 1
Probability and Statistics – PS1401 is designed for students in grades 11 and 12 who may not have attained a deep and integrated understanding of the topics in earlier grades. Students acquire a comprehensive understanding of how to represent and interpret data; how to relate data sets; independent and conditional probability; applying probability; making relevant inferences and conclusions; and how to use probability to make decisions.

Credits: 1
Consumer  Mathematics – MA1401 explains how four basic mathematical operations – addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division – can be used to solve real-life problems. It addresses practical applications for math, such as wages, taxes, money management, and interest and credit. Projects for the Real World activities are included that promote cross-curricular learning and higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills.

Science – 2 credits

Credits: 1
Chemistry – CH1201 surveys chemical theory, descriptive chemistry, and changes in matter and its properties. Students learn how to classify different states of matter as well as how atoms and compounds are structured. Additional areas of discussion include chemical energetics, measurements, bonding, stoichiometry, ionization, hydrocarbons, oxidation and reduction. A variety of simple lab experiments are included.
Credits: 1
Physics – PY1101 introduces students to the physics of motion, properties of matter, force, heat, vector, light, and sound. Students learn the history of physics from the discoveries of Galileo and Newton to those of contemporary physicists. The course focuses more on explanation than calculation and prepares students for introductory quantitative physics at the college level. Additional areas of discussion include gases and  liquids, atoms, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear physics.

Social Science

Credits: o.5
The interactive, problem-centered, and inquiry-based units in U.S. Government emphasize the acquisition, mastery, and processing of information. Semester A units include study of the foundations of American government and the American political culture, with units 2 and 3 covering the U.S. constitution, including its roots in Greek and English law, and the various institutions that impact American politics. In Semester B, students will study Congress and the Presidency, as well as federal agencies and the judiciary.

Credits: 1
World History – WH1401 provide a robust and comprehensive overview for your students. Beginning with early civilizations in the Middle East, India, and China, the combined eight units conclude with a survey of the world since 1945. Other topics include a review of the Byzantine empire, the resurgence of Europe, and the impacts of nationalism and democracy. The courses are flexible, offering optional topics, an array of learning resources, and a variety of engaging activities.
Credits: 0.5
In World History Before 1815 – WH1402, students study human events from the first use of agriculture 15,000 years ago through the  end of the French Revolution in 1815. Included are lessons on the ancient civilizations of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Later lessons examine the great periods of global exploration and expansion, as well as scientific discovery. Also studied are the revolutions in England, America, and France.

Credits: 0.5
World History Since 1815 – WH1403 follows human history from the end of the French Revolution until the present day. Topics covered include the Industrial Revolution, the African and Asian colonial experience, the rise of European Nationalism, and the horrors of World War I. In the second half students read about the rise of totalitarian ideologies of Fascism and Communism, World War II, the Cold War, Post-Colonial Africa, the Rise of Asian Economies, and the Global War on Terror.

Credits: 1
World History Since 1500 – WH1404 follows human history from the Renaissance and the end of the Middle Ages until the present day. Topics covered include the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, Industrial Revolution, the African and Asian colonial experience, the rise of European Nationalism, and the horrors of World War I. In the second half students learn about the rise of totalitarian ideologies of Fascism and Communism, World War II, the Cold War, Post-Colonial Africa, the Rise of Asian Economies, and the Global War on Terror.

Credits: 0.5
Native American Studies: Historical Perspectives – NA1401
By providing historical perspectives, this course provides a comprehensive understanding of the roots of Native American culture. The topics addressed include an exploration of the Native American history in the arctic and subarctic, various regions of the U.S., and the development of Native American life as it became increasingly affected by US development by Europeans.

Credits: 0.5
Native American Studies: Contemporary Perspectives – NA1402 complements Native American Studies: Historical Perspectives – NA1401. It explores Native American worldviews, art, media perspectives on Native Americans, and contemporary perspectives and organizations. It concludes by providing a global perspective by examining issues face by indigenous peoples throughout the world.

Credits: 0.5
Because the specifics of social issues change rapidly, Social Issues – SS1401 course is designed to have students discover contemporary and relevant perspectives on issues that may have been around for centuries. Students engage in significant research and each lesson ends with an essay assignment that encourages students to express their opinions. Topics include media, government, civil liberties, poverty, terrorism, crime, the environment, and many more.

Credits: 0.5
African American Studies – AA1401 course traces the experiences of Africans in the Americas from 1500 to the present day. In this course, students will explore history, politics, and culture. Although the course proceeds in chronological order, lessons are also grouped by themes and trends in African American history. Therefore, some time periods and important people are featured in more than one lesson.

Miscellaneous

Credits: 1
In Spanish – SP1401 course, students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. The course exemplifies a marriage of the best in language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store”. Each week consists of an ongoing  adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Credits: 0.5
Personal Finance – PF1401 course focuses on reviewing and applying arithmetic skills utilized at home and in business. Students learn how to budget, spend, invest, and make every day financial decisions. Topics include budgeting, computing income and property taxes, investing in the stock market, finding interest rates, analyzing statistics, and balancing financial accounts.
Credits: 0.5
Throughout Career Explorations – CE1401 course, students will practice valuable life and career skills, including resume writing, interview techniques, budgeting, time management, and long-term planning. This course also encourages learners to use a number of employment resources both in print and on the Internet. Practical topics are engagingly presented and include search skills, industry clusters, entrepreneurship, and effective resume preparation and interviewing skills.

Credits: 0.5
As in other areas of life, success in academics results from learning and practicing positive habits. This one- semester elective provides practical, hands-on guidance on developing and improving study habits and skills, regardless of a student’s level of accomplishment. Academic Success includes five lessons and two course activities in a flexible structure that is adaptable to the needs and circumstances of individual students. The course can also be used for college-level developmental education.